Erin Condren Teacher Planner Review

Erin Condren Teacher Planner Review

I think I've tried every single teacher planner out there. Everything from office store generic types to planners designed for homeschoolers. I've gotten creative and used a bullet journal and scribbled tomorrow's lesson in a plain spiral notebook. All of them get the job done. I'm never going to tell you that any of these methods is inherently better than another.

In fact, if you are schooling more than one kid using different levels, this may not work for you at all, which is ironic since it is designed to be used by classroom teachers. However, They are teaching 25 kids the same thing, and you may be teaching four different grade levels.

If you want to treat yourself and like the Erin Condren brand than the teacher planner, this year is probably their best version ever. I'll show you how I tweaked it for homeschooling.

  I'm doing what I like to call old-fashioned blogging here today. This post isn't going to be linked up to some fantastic Pinterest SEO termed graphics, it is the last thing I'm typing up before my hiatus, and I'm just trying to get this up before I leave you all hanging for a while.

I paid for this baby myself, so no worries that I'm biased in any way. In fact, for my stuff, I'm back with my old Passion Planner- I use this one for lesson planning only.

I have too much going on to keep it all together and honestly; the Passion Planner is more like bullet journaling which is my ideal method.

I should probably write that post too when I get back in August.

Let's get to it. First of all, you can choose from a gazillion covers, color combos, and personalizations. I decided on this vintage floral print to match our new house.

 

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Inside the front and back cover, there are whiteboards- which come in handy for impromptu sentence diagramming and math problem explanations.

No more searching around for scratch paper!

They also make great schedulers. I like to write a quick rundown of the week in the front that I can glance at as needed.

 

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In the planning section, there are twelve squares with the months of the year on them. If you use Unit Studies or want to achieve specific goals on a monthly basis, you can leave it as is.

 I had a different idea in mind.

I (choose one)

can't leave well enough alone

like to use various resources

am indecisive

 So, I reallocated the stickers from the back of the book to cover the months of the year with subject titles.

I'm using the two pages for First and Second Semester with six subjects for each term.

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This coincides nicely with the fact that there are six subject slots on the daily planning pages. We have more than six subjects, but we don't do all of them daily so I combine them into just six categories to make them fit.

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There are checklist pages in the back of the planner that I'm going to use as reading logs, memory work tracking pages, and possibly chore charting. The skies the limit. 

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I wouldn't have guessed that I'd find placing stickers so therapeutic, but I do. The planner comes with a few pages of them which I scatter around as needed to mark essential school events. They sell pretty monthly sticker packs too if you are so inclined to indulge in that or the multicolor pens that look so good on the Insta. As far as pens go we swear by the erasable Frixion that we buy in bulk from Amazon. I also have a set of Papermate Flair fine tips that I use when I want to be fancy.

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Hocus Pocus and the All New Sequel

Hocus Pocus and the All New Sequel

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