Flashes of Genius Series

I jumped at the chance to read this new series from Chicago Review Press. They are simple enough for a seven-year-old reluctant reader yet are packed full of such interesting information that I'd go up to twelve-year-olds as an audience. The cartoon graphics keep it light and fun all while making their stories relatable. I liked that the stories started in childhood and most of these guys were a bit quirky. It's always great to show kids that a rough childhood isn't a predictor of future success. I'll give each of these books a full review over on Goodreads. I found that they make what could be complicated science understandable and encourage further reading on the subject matter.

 After waffling back and forth about what science we should tackle this year I went with the history of science. We're starting with Joy Hakim's The Story of Science: Aristotle Leads the Way, and I think these books will fit right into the fold. I'll probably post an update blog post with the materials that I'm scheduling now that I've committed.

He took his

grandfather's theory of evolution and proved it true. Darwin spent five long years aboard The Beagle collecting more specimens than anyone could have imagined.

The Theory

of Relativity had military applications even though Einstein himself was a pacifist.

His laws

seemed like "magic" during his lifetime. Now we know he discovered how the universe works.

An Artist

who thought in scientific terms if his notebooks had been organized and known earlier civilization would have advanced centuries earlier.