The Mad Wolf's Daughter

After reading some "happy sigh" books lately, I'm tempted to turn this into a "happy sigh" book only blog. I mean, why waste time with ho-hum regular books when you can enter another time for a few hours and emerge with a "happy sigh"? The last fifty pages of this book were me reading as slowly as possible so it wouldn't end. 

 Prior to this adventure, Drest trained to be as tough as her five brothers and father named, "Mad Wolf". She believed all their one-sided war stories completely. When a band of knights captures them all, Drest is left alone to save them. During their capture, she sees one knight attack another leaving him for dead. This is her first glimpse into the reality that not everyone is who they say they are. Along with the injured knight, who may or may not be her new friend she attempts to rescue her family. The story isn't just an adventure, in many ways, it is a coming of age story as Drest learns more about her family and some of the terrible things they have done in the name of war. Even in medieval days deciding that you aren't going to behave like your family is an unsettling part of growing up.

Drest and her adventures held me spellbound, and for the time I was reading, I felt immersed in medieval Scotland. The Authors Notes and Glossary show how meticulously accurate this story is. I'm wishing for a sequel or better yet a series featuring Drest, a tough, fair, female knight.

Verdict- Buy- Especially all you homeschoolers we're just starting our medieval year, and this fits perfectly into a living book list for grammar or logic stage history. It's not too young for high schoolers either if you need something light to balance out some original source reading.

I received an ARC from the author in exchange for an honest review. Thank you!

Mad Wolf's Daughter By Diane Magras  March 6, 2018

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Jennifer Naughton

I'm a lifelong bibliophile who happens to love children's books and who should have become a librarian. Instead I horde books in case of apocalypse or the enactment of a Fahrenheit 451 type law. My five kids accept my addiction and have learned to accept books in odd places.