Food Fight! A Mouthwatering History of Who Ate What and Why Through the Ages

This review practically wrote itself. This is a perfect go along to any history or geographical study that you may have going on this year. The best part? It has recipes for those adventurous eaters that are everywhere but at my house and unless you go through all of human history in one year, you can get multiple school years out of it. I could also see people with a Coop making a history of food type class with this. 

From caveman snacks, right on up to foods you can eat in Outer Space this book covers all the major civilizations. You get history, pictures (that Nat Geo is known for) and recipes. Each chapter includes common foods eaten at the time, sample menus, table manners and usually a day in the life and a fun quiz. 

There are fifteen chapters and bonus food timeline and recipe index. We had a great time reading tidbits to each other for a few nights while I was cooking dinner. Kids and adults ages 4 and up will learn something from this for sure.

Please note that I received a free advance ARC of this book from Nat Geo without a review requirement or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that, I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.

Nat Geo Kids- Food Fight! by Tanya Steel

September 11, 2018

The Bookshop Girl

Think Willy Wonka but you win a bookshop instead of a chocolate factory mixed with the mystery of A Series of Unfortunate Events, and you get The Bookshop Girl.

Property Jones and her family own a small cute bookshop and on a whim enter a contest to win the Montgomery Book Emporium. They know books so who better to run the best bookshop in London.

What I liked about it: magic, Property herself, the bookstore cat, lots and lots of vivid book descriptions and the happy ending. 

There wasn't anything I didn't like except that I wished it was way longer, but it is right on target for elementary readers. 

I see some reviews from 2017, so maybe this was picked up by a new publisher or something, but the book I read will be in stores October 1, 2018

Please note that I received a free advance E ARC of this book from Edelweiss+ without a review requirement or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that, I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.

The Bookshop Girl by Sylvia Bishop

Trapped in Room 217

I know authors' hate it when you compare their book to another, but I can't stop myself from doing it. This is very Goosebump-esque. I say that for two reasons:

1. If you've read Goosebumps and like them, then you know what you're getting with this book.

2. If you hate Goosebumps, you'll know to skip this one.

This book is part of a new series called The Haunted States of America series that will focus on "haunted locals" in the different states. I loved that this story centered on the infamous Stanley Hotel in Colorado. Stephen King wrote The Shining after staying there in 1974. So, right there the atmosphere gets a thumbs up. It's labeled MG horror, but between you and me it's more like MG creepy. Unless you've got a sensitive reader, this one won't inspire nightmares.

The main characters in the story are staying at the hotel with their Dad while he works nearby for the week. That leaves two kids wandering around a "haunted" hotel on their own. They see a ghost and then investigate who it might be. 

I'm looking forward to reading more of the books in this series.

Please note that I received a free advance E ARC of this book from NetGalley without a review requirement or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that, I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.

Trapped in Room 217 by Thomas Kingsley Troupe

The Splintered Light

As every other review says, this book is similar to The Giver. I don't want to get into the plot much because spoilers will ruin this book for you.

Ishmael can see colors while others cannot, and he follows his calling to The Commons to be a Color Keeper. The plot gets plenty twisty from this point on so go ahead and slog through the beginning, and let the story unfold. 

It was the creative plot twists that won me over. Every time I thought I knew where things were headed I was wrong. That's unusual in the MG category. This isn't just a fantasy book as it tackles complicated family relationships and all the hard parts of growing up and embracing your destiny which may be different than that of your family.

It's everything a book should be. It's funny, smart, thought-provoking and more than a little sad as growing up often is.  

Please note that I received a free advance E ARC of this book from NetGalley without a review requirement or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that, I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.

The Splintered Light by Ginger Johnson