Never Home Alone

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This book is perfect for anyone high school age on up who have an interest in weird biology. Everything from Toxoplasma gondii which we already all try to ignore to the many, many little critters that we can't see and I'm all skeeved out by now.

The microbes that live in hot water heaters and shower heads are particularly worrisome to me. I also enjoyed the chapter on the International Space Station. It is so exciting how most of the microbes caught a ride up there in the astronauts gut. You know, in a weird geeky way.

As a serial renovator the sections on moldy drywall were especially pertinent to me.

I'm planning on including parts of this book when my kid gets to high school Biology.

Caveat: Skip this if you or your kids are easily creeped out by the microscopic. I’d hate to see anyone facing a kid who won’t shower or touch the walls. :)

My thanks to NetGalley for the advance copy.

Never Home Alone by Rob Dunn

Dreyer's English

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You might be a grammar geek if you chuckle at the cover of this book. It sets the tone perfectly. What if you aren’t a grammar geek and want to improve your writing? This book works for you as well. So funny that you won’t want to skip even the footnotes. I read it cover to cover in a couple of days and can see myself referring back to it as a reference book.
The publisher says it is the new Elements With Style and I’d agree. It is more of an everyman's guide to English grammar. Even if you don’t write for school or work- you are for sure tweeting and emailing. I always tell my students that we are all writers. Being a capable writer will put you ahead in any situation.
Every writer has some bad habits, and Dreyer covers the most frequent errors in a way that makes me less cringy than just seeing all the red pen on my words. He sets the tone of a friend who may give your writing a run through with both humor and a bit of sarcasm.

Please note that I received a free advance E ARC of this book from Edelweiss without a review requirement or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that, I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.
I am buying a copy for my library and hope to incorporate it into our homeschool high school grammar lessons.

Dreyer’s English by Benjamin Dreyer

American Advertising Cookbooks

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If you look at Pinterest today, you’ll see plenty of recipes pins sponsored by Pillsbury, Campbell’s Soup or some other food company. Cookbooks (back then and pins now) are a way to introduce new ways to use their products. That much you know, it’s been going on forever. I remember the jello molds free at the grocery store that came free with a purchase and included a recipe book.

This book is a fantastic history book of not only America's love of food both processed and fresh but the real story about how the recipes affected sales and the American diet.

You also get the history of both bananas and pineapples which was intriguing and slightly nefarious.

I do a unit of Kitchen Chemistry with my high school kids, and this book will fit right into that.

American Advertising Cookbooks by Christina Ward

Smart but Scattered--and Stalled: 10 Steps to Help Young Adults Use Their Executive Skills to Set Goals, Make a Plan, and Successfully Leave the Nest

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This review is going to be especially applicable to parents of a certain age. Remember when reading What to Expect While You’re Expecting was your go-to book? Fast forward to today, and this is the replacement. Maybe you have kids that went away to school, graduated and landed back in your home. Or you have kids who graduated and never really left or some other version of the story that emerges after you get together with old friends for a drink or two. It’s happening all around us, and we all seem flummoxed over the right course of action.

Dads seem to lean into the hardcore and Moms are usually the softer touch, and these twenty-something kids have learned to get what they want from all of us. Not that it’s all their fault, it’s sort of a perfect storm that this generation is navigating. Do they need a degree? Should they follow their bliss? You can’t blame them for being confused by the whole new paradigm.

This book though- it’s gold.

You’ve got checklists, quizzes, and resources for both you and your kid. The best part? The co-author is the real-life stuck kid of the author. This isn’t some tough love book, but it does point out ways that you may have made it easy for your kid to feel so safe at home that leaving isn’t appealing.

This is a book that you can use together to make a plan that fits your situation and helps you to implement that plan as well.

I read it on my kindle but have it preordered for the January release date.

Please note that I received a free advance E ARC of this book from Edelweiss without a review requirement or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that, I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.

Smart but Scattered--and Stalled: 10 Steps to Help Young Adults Use Their Executive Skills to Set Goals, Make a Plan, and Successfully Leave the Nest by Richard Guare, Colin Guare and Peg Dawson